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3 things to consider about self-representation

As a St. Louis college student, you have your whole future ahead of you. Though you may not be an independent adult and occasionally reach out to your parents for financial support, you are an adult in the eyes of the law. If you commit a crime, the last thing you might want to do is tell your parents about the situation. However, it might be the best course of action to achieve a proper resolution. 

Criminal charges of any nature are nothing to shrug off and ignore. You might think that since it is your first offense, that you have nothing to worry about. You might even believe you can represent yourself in court. Before you take chances and do something that could derail your future, consider why self-representation can backfire on you. 

3 common homicide case errors

Countless people die every day, and the investigations that follow a murder usually occur at the hands of humans susceptible to error like anybody else. Of course, the stakes are much higher when the matter in question is a homicide, so investigators should avoid errors at all costs. Despite this, there are many mistakes that happen and complicate murder cases and implicate innocent parties in crimes they did not commit. 

If you are facing a charge of homicide, your entire life is on the line. A conviction could land you in prison for the rest of your life. An acquittal, conversely, could clear your name and restore your reputation. It is vital that you fight for your future with assistance from an experienced defense lawyer. It is imperative that the defendants' guilt not rest on a case that is questionable. 

Facing money laundering charges in Missouri

Both federal and Missouri state laws contain prohibitions against money laundering. Generally, this crime consists of purposely concealing the illegal provenance of funds.

The Missouri statute applies the label of money laundering to transactions that aim to support criminal activity, to conceal the source of the money, to avoid reporting requirements or to fund terrorism. Federal distinguishes among three types of money laundering, each of which has somewhat differing criteria.

Should I plead the fifth when facing criminal charges?

One question that might cross your mind as you contemplate possible defense tactics is if you should plead the fifth. Regardless of the criminal charges you face, you have a constitutional right to avoid self-incrimination by remaining silent. You might believe you have to answer every question law enforcement asks, but the only information you must provide is information that identifies who you are, such as your name, date of birth and address. 

During your arrest and trial, you might feel an overwhelming need to offer explanations to law enforcement and the courts. You might also feel like sharing your story with cellmates, friends and family. It is important for you to realize that anything you say might become evidence used to convict you. It does not matter if you are guilty of the charges that are pending against you or not, it can be beneficial for you to plead the fifth

Facing marijuana drug charges in Missouri: drug court

The last article discussed the different types of charges for marijuana possession. Sometimes the users of marijuana and other controlled substances have an addiction and would benefit more from help than confinement.

The courts recognize this and have put additional measures in place that can help such people recover and become productive members of society. Drug court is a strong component to these efforts.

Facing marijuana drug charges in Missouri: types

Over the last few years, various law professionals have been working together to improve the sentencing for marijuana charges. Thankfully, their efforts are resulting in regulations that are not so harsh for first-time and minor offenders.

However, those individuals who are guilty of possessing marijuana will still have to face those charges. The penalty depends upon the type of charge that parties face. 

Is the government pursuing you for suspected mail fraud?

If you face accusations of mail fraud and indicted on federal charges, the government will be relentless when the court case against you takes place.

Mail fraud takes many forms, and you may or may not have run afoul of the law. In any case, you will need legal representation in order to deal successfully with the U.S. government.

What is entrapment

If you face federal drug or fraud charges, entrapment may be one of the defenses available to you. It is important to understand that effective use of this defense involves many nuances.

The legal definition of entrapment can differ greatly from popular understanding. An experienced criminal defense attorney can evaluate the facts of your case and come up with strategies designed for optimal effect.

Understanding federal wire fraud charges

Wire fraud is a federal crime that consists of using an interstate communications device in the course of pursuing a scheme to defraud a person or entity of any type of item of value. Even though the law refers to the crime as wire fraud, it also includes wireless communications such as cell phones.

Calling, texting or e-mailing as part of a scheme to defraud can trigger this federal charge.

INTERESTED IN CLEANING UP YOUR CRIMINAL RECORD?!

On January 1, 2018, the new Missouri expungement law becomes effective that will allow persons who have been arrested, pled guilty or even convicted of certain criminal offenses have these matters expunged from their permanent record.

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