Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are conducting most of our consultations virtually, either on-line or over the phone. That said, if any of our clients or potential clients wish to visit our office in person, we are happy to see them, provided social distancing protocols are observed.

Frank, Juengel & Radefeld, Attorneys at Law

Local: 314-282-8657
Toll Free: 800-748-2105

Defenders Of The Accused
Matthew Radefeld & Dan Juengel

When law enforcement officials accuse you of a crime, you could face serious consequences whether you’re guilty or not. Even if you have a strong defense, you might lose hope of acquittal. Yet, as an accused party, it’s crucial to remember your rights. The Sixth Amendment of the United States Constitution grants you six which are inalienable.

Understanding the Sixth Amendment

As a defendant, the Sixth Amendment protects you from unfair and unjust treatment before and during your trial. The amendment guarantees that your trial will be speedy and public. Thus, law enforcement officials cannot hold you indefinitely. And any court proceedings cannot happen in secret. Furthermore, the amendment grants you the right to an impartial jury. This jury must represent a cross-section of your community. And it must be free from all bias that could tilt your case’s verdict. The amendment also declares your right to knowledge of the nature and cause of any accusation made against you. Your access to this information allows you to defend yourself against it.

The amendment’s Confrontation Clause decrees that, for a trial to be fair, you must face your accuser. If they are crucial in proving your case, their absence could lead to its dismissal. You also have the right to compulsory process, where you can subpoena favorable witnesses to defend you. And the Sixth Amendment also guarantees your right to counsel. Your ability to retain an attorney gives you a fair and effective way of standing up for yourself and guarding against an unjust outcome.

Asserting your rights

As you prepare for trial, knowing your Sixth Amendment rights can help you make a stronger case. You may still fear the cards will be stacked against you. But the amendment’s provisions will uphold the fairness of the process.