Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are conducting most of our consultations virtually, either on-line or over the phone. That said, if any of our clients or potential clients wish to visit our office in person, we are happy to see them, provided social distancing protocols are observed.

Frank, Juengel & Radefeld, Attorneys at Law

Local: 314-282-8657
Toll Free: 800-748-2105

Defenders Of The Accused
Matthew Radefeld & Dan Juengel

When it comes to your personal circumstances, no one knows better how to manage them than you. However, when your situation has you facing charges for a criminal offense in St. Louis, it is best for you to consider other options.

The criminal justice system is very complex. It is especially difficult for you to navigate the system when you are dealing with legal matters on your own. The wrong word or action can result in more charges and penalties. You should take extra care to avoid the following concerns when facing criminal charges. 

Social media activity is admissible evidence 

While you are awaiting trial, you may feel tempted to go back to your normal habits such as using social media. Before you log into your accounts, keep in mind that anything you do and share is liable to become evidence.

You do not necessarily need to make posts and share photos and videos that declare what your actions were at the time of the crime. The prosecution can potentially use anything you do online to link you to unlawful activities that can become evidence in your trial and lead to a conviction. 

Your words can be damaging 

Just as what you write and post online can be used against, you, so can anything you say to another person. You may want your close friends, relatives or cellmate (at the time of arrest) to know your side of things. However, be cautious about what you say to others. Do not mention anything regarding the charges you face or the crime in question. It is all right for you to mention your court date. But everything else is best left for you to discuss with an attorney. 

You need to walk a fine line when awaiting your trial. Before you do or say anything, always think about the consequences your actions can have on your criminal case that could derail your defense and get you a less than desirable outcome.